Blog

Blog

The twelve soccer stadiums in Brazil where World Cup matches are happening this month are in many different climates. Some are hot and humid. Some are hot and dry. Others are slightly cooler.
For my first blog entry for UCAR, I would like to share a bit about sundogs (also called mock suns or parhelia). I got a good look at this atmospheric phenomena out the window of a bus on my way to Boulder, CO on a morning in April, 2014.
Cars slipping on ice
Ice is slippery, causing cars and trucks to skid out of control. You can safely explore how cars slip on ice by making a model of an icy road and testing out how well the wheels of toy cars grip onto the ice.
ice
When it’s freezing outside, it can be icy too. People walking down the street find their feet sliding in directions that they didn’t intend. A few unlucky ones slip and fall. But have you ever wondered why we slip?
A guest post by NCAR scientist Peggy Lemone - How do you measure rain? And how accurate are the measurements?
boulder creek
At Boulder's climate station, 14.6 inches of rain fell between September 9, and early morning, September 13, 2013. Most of that rain (more than 9 inches) fell on September 12. That’s a lot, right? Or is it?
Moore Books for Moore Kids
A guest post by SOARS Protege Diamilet Perez Betancourt - I sometimes find it hard to remember the broader impacts of my research – that is, until a tornado hits.
Participate in hurricane research without getting wet! At the Cyclone Center, you evaluate images of tropical storms that occurred over the past 30 years.
Friday, May 31, 2013 is a day that I’ll remember for the rest of my life. I didn’t see my first tornado, but this was my first encounter with an Oklahoma supercell thunderstorm. I experienced so many different emotions during the day.
Denver thunderstorm
UCAR Center for Science Education Staffer Becca Hatheway encountered a tornado yesterday on her way to Denver International Airport. Naturally, this made her think about bears.