Atmosphere Activities

Atmosphere Activities

Students use a simple model to explore how roof colors can impact the temperature of an urban area.

Students analyze the energy consumption of a hypothetical household to determine the amount of carbon dioxide they are adding to the atmosphere each year.

Students will experiment to understand variations in the amount of ground-level ozone between different places in their neighborhood, town, or city.

In this hands-on activity, students explore how temperature affects the behavior of air molecules.

Students observe that air under high pressure will move toward a low-pressure area and certain objects in the air’s path may move in the same direction.

Air takes up space. It's only when air in the bottle escapes that more air is easily added!

An experiment that demonstrates why there are clouds in the sky. Start with air, invisible water vapor, particles we call condensation nuclei, and air pressure...the cloud comes later!

Students learn how to crush a can with only air pressure.

Learn about Bernoulli's Principle with hair dryers and ping pong balls!

Find out how some wavelengths of light are scattered more than others producing blue skies and red sunsets.

Use plungers to create a vacuum and learn about how air exerts pressure.

Students create graphic organizers describing the four major air pollutants regulated by the U.S. Clean Air Act (ground-level ozone, particle pollution, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide) and then identify the pollutants with a guessing game.

Students play the role of nitrogen atoms traveling through the nitrogen cycle to gain understanding of the varied pathways through the cycle and the relevance of nitrogen to living things.

In this activity students get a sense of the many ways in which daily activities use natural resources and contribute to air pollution.

In this activity, students create molecule models using marshmallows to understand and explain how smog forms.

In this computer-based virtual lab, students will learn about the layers of Earth's atmosphere by launching virtual balloons to collect temperature and pressure data at various altitudes. Given a limited number of balloon flights, students must plan carefully to gather data that generates a good "picture" of the atmosphere’s structure.

A collection of educational resources to bring cloud science to elementary students.

Students will observe two scale models of Earth's atmosphere and the layers of the atmosphere to gain an appreciation for the size of the atmosphere compared to the planet Earth.

In this activity, students use a graph to make a hypothesis about the difference between urban heat in New York City streets and in Central Park.

Use jelly beans to compare the compositons (amounts of different gases) of the atmospheres of Earth, Mars and Venus.

This teaching box is filled with educational resources that help students explore the science of, and solutions to, air pollution.

In this activity, students will construct models of the arrangement of water molecules in the three physical states. Students will understand that matter can be found in three forms or phases (solid, liquid, and gas).

In this activity, students will observe and measure the water given off through transpiration by a plant in a small terrarium. 
IntroductionIn this activity, students will develop a model of a forest using plastic bottles and then observe and analyze changes in winds related to differences in forest density. 

Students observe how different materials bend light, and how we can infer the nature of the material based on the amount it bends light rays.

Students observe that a change in the temperature of air can impact the size of a bubble placed on a bottle that is cooled and/or heated.
In this activity, students brainstorm various ways that an uninflated balloon placed over a bottle's opening can be inflated without touching the balloon.
In this activity, students move chips representing sunlight, heat, and infrared radiation around a series of boards representing Earth and its atmosphere.

Students will use soda to explore how carbon dioxide is able to dissolve into liquid. They will learn about Henry's law, which describes how the solubility of gas into liquids is dependent on temperature and develop hypotheses about how the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, a greenhouse gas, is affected by rising atmospheric and oceanic temperatures.

Students use a model to test actions for staying safe from the Sun's ultraviolet radiation. 

Students follow steps to dilute a colored dye in water until the dye is one part per million. Then students consider atmospheric gases that are present in trace qualitites, like ozone and discuss how pollutants can be hazardous at very small concentrations.
IntroductionIn this activity, students observe how rubber bands deteriorate, developing cracks or pits, in locations with different ozone levels.
IntroductionIn this activity, students will play the roles of various atoms and molecules to help them better understand the formation and destruction of ozone in the stratosphere.

Students will investigate how different surfaces of the Earth reflect and absorb heat and apply this knowledge to real-world situations.

In this activity, students use models to observe that air is a fluid that flows due to temperature-driven density differences.